Courses

Liberal Arts Courses

Students are free to choose any four courses. Each course is worth four semester hours of credit. Click on the course title to learn more and download the syllabus.

Spring Semester 2023

January 16–May 6

Please disregard dates/times listed on course syllabi. Regarding prerequisites, we will honor any AP course credit that has been accepted by your home institution.

Economics

This course studies the multiple links between the economy and the environment, and analyzes theoretically and empirically the set of policy instruments normally used to address modern environmental problems. It also consider environmental policy through political economy lenses, namely it analyzes political and societal factors that affect what policy instruments governments tend to choose. Typical questions that will be answered are: What are the most pressing environmental problems? How and why does economic activity create these problems? What are the policy instruments that governments and other relevant decision makers can use to protect the environment? What are the economics costs of environmental regulation and is there a case for a ‘’double dividend” from environmental policy? How do we determine the optimal level of environmental protection at societal level? What are the economic effects of climate change and why does it prove particularly difficult to pass and implement climate policies?


Instructor: Pamela Campa, and guest lecturer Elena Paltseva
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by economics departments.
Prerequisites: Two courses in microeconomics, two courses in macroeconomics, and one course in calculus.

After a brief introduction with the history of the European Union and its main institutions, we start with the microeconomics of European Integration and examine the effects of moving towards a Europe outlined in the Treaty of Rome (1957) with free flows of goods and services, capital and people. We then turn to the macro-economics of European integration and examine benefits and costs of monetary integration and the adoption of the Euro. The course will give you the theoretical tools to understand various policy issues, ranging from the recent Greek crises to the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) currently negotiated by the EU and the US.


Instructor: Pehr-Johan Norbäck
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by economics departments.
Prerequisites: Two courses in macroeconomics, two courses in microeconomics, and one course in calculus. Students lacking one of these prerequisites in economics may be able to enroll with permission from the Executive Director. We recognize that courses at your home institution may be organized and titled differently but cover the same content suggested by our prerequisites. If you need help determining whether your prior coursework fulfills our prerequisites, please contact us at info@swedishprogram.org.

In this course, the students will learn the basics of Econometrics (for cross-sectional data) and receive an introduction to Machine Learning (ML). This course also includes further essential mathematical methods that are used in economic and financial analysis. The importance of data science to businesses and economic analysis is discussed. Guest lectures will include relevant professionals from the Swedish industry. The course covers important econometric concepts such as: random sample, central limit theorem, estimation, inference (hypothesis testing), regression models, causality, randomized experiments, as well as the ML concepts: supervised learning (prediction and classification), unsupervised learning (clustering). This course also introduces some mathematics: integration, topics in financial mathematics, and matrices. In this course, the program R is used to facilitate the learning of Econometrics and ML. The students will use different R-packages for the analysis of regression models, causality, randomized experiments, prediction, classification, clustering, etc., and students will also learn how data and results can be visualized. Lastly, there will be an introduction to calculating in Excel.


Instructor: Rickard Sandberg
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by economics departments.
Prerequisites: One course in both macroeconomics and microeconomics, one course in calculus, one course in statistics, working knowledge of the statistical software R, and a GPA of at least 3.3 in prior economics courses. Students lacking one of these prerequisites in economics may be able to enroll with permission from the Executive Director. We recognize that courses at your home institution may be organized and titled differently but cover the same content suggested by our prerequisites. If you need help determining whether your prior coursework fulfills our prerequisites, please contact us at info@swedishprogram.org.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first five Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

To tackle economic and social challenges, we need to understand how individuals and firms behave and how they respond to policy changes. Economic theory provide ways to think about how agents act. Data allow us to quantify these relationships and test competing hypotheses. This course teaches how economic theory can be used to deepen our understanding economic and social problems, and how data can be used to test the predictions derived from theory. The core part of the course covers the most common methods economists use in empirical research, with a particular focus on causal inference. The empirical methods will be organized around a number of economic and social problems. For each problem, the basic theoretical apparatus required to form testable hypotheses are introduced followed by the econometric techniques used to test the hypotheses. Seminars will focus on applying the theory and econometric techniques using real data.


Instructor: Robert Östling
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by economics departments.
Prerequisites: One course in microeconomics, one course in statistics, working knowledge of the basics of econometrics, working knowledge of the statistical software R, and a GPA of at least 3.3 in prior economics courses. Students lacking one of these prerequisites in economics may be able to enroll with permission from the Executive Director. We recognize that courses at your home institution may be organized and titled differently but cover the same content suggested by our prerequisites. If you need help determining whether your prior coursework fulfills our prerequisites, please contact us at info@swedishprogram.org.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first five Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Public Policy, Sociology, and Politics

During the Cold War, the existence of a trans-Atlantic civilization was more or less given – no one questioned that the countries of Western Europe had more in common with the countries of North American than with their immediate neighbors behind the Iron Curtain. In the past several years, however, there has arisen a small cottage industry devoted to puncturing the post-Marshall Plan consensus. In other words, we are now told that Europe and America not only do not form a common civilization, but that they are fundamentally, irretrievably different.

This course will evaluate these competing claims, investigating the similarities and differences between Europe and American from the perspective of public policy. The course will be divided into three major sections. The first section, This is Europe, is an overview of the European Union and its most important policy areas and challenges. The second section, Farewell to the Welfare State?, is an oveview of the past, present, and future of the European-style strong welfare state, with a focus on developments in Sweden. The final section, Multiculturalism and its Discontents, is a discussion of Europe’s, and in particular Sweden’s, perhaps greatest challenge: how to deal with a rapidly diversifying population and the resulting conflict between competing sets of values.


Instructor: Jonas Brodin
Credit: This course is typically given credit by sociology, political science, and history departments.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

Health care systems are embedded in economic, political, and social structures and reflect a country’s cultural values. This class will look at the historical development of health care systems in Sweden and the U.S., medical education, and the type of institutional settings in which health care is provided. We will also look at the role of the health care consumer in each country and how factors such as race, class, and gender impact citizens’ access to and experience in the health care system.


Instructor: Jonas Brodin
Credit: This course is typically given credit by sociology and political science departments.

People move from one place to another – and always have. Migration might be voluntary and economic – in search of a better life – or forced and political – simply to save one’s life. Whatever the nature of migration, it always has consequences that go far beyond the simple increases and decreases in population – for example, the current migrant crisis in Europe has strengthened far-right populism and isolationism, seen most dramatically in Britain’s decision to withdraw from the EU. It should come as no surprise, then, that migration is perpetually at the center of our political discourse. In this course, we will investigate migration and its consequences fro a number of different perspectives. The first section of the course will take a historical perspective, looking at past migration flows and the many ways in which those flows have transformed the places that migrants leave, pass through, and settle in. The next section examines the migrant experience from multiple angles – from how rhetoric surrounding immigration influences public policy, to the barriers and policies related to the integration of immigrants in different areas – culture, the labor market, and criminal justice. The final section of the course will critically examine current migration debates and case studies. At the end of this section – and the course – students should be able to analyze those debates and case studies and understand the consequences of migration more fully.


Instructor: Jonas Brodin
Credit: This course is typically given credit by sociology and political science departments.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

Social innovation can offer new and innovative solutions to meeting societal needs. It therefore offers the opportunity to respond to societal challenges and improve well-being and the quality of life for communities and societies across the world. The purpose of this course is to integrate ideas related to social innovation in all sectors of social life to address global challenges. Students will be expected to engage in a group project that links social innovation to one or more of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals: no poverty; zero hunger; good health and well-being; quality education; gender equality; clean water and sanitation; affordable and clean energy; decent work and economic growth; industry innovation and infrastructure, reduced inequalities; sustainable cities and communities; responsible consumption and production; climate action; life below water; life on land; peace, justice and strong institutions; and partnerships for the goals.

The group project will be carried out in teams of 5-6 students. Each team will be part of a larger Tutoring Group (TG) consisting of 4 teams. The aim is to advance each project in a collaborative process, where groups give constructive and supportive feedback to each other. In this process, the teachers will serve the role of facilitators, rather than experts. Consequently, active participation and contribution to other project groups is an important part of the learning process.


Instructor: To be announced.
Credit: This course is typically granted credit by sociology and political science departments.
Prerequisites: One course in either political science or sociology.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first five Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Psychology

The nature of prejudice has been a topic of study in psychology, sociology, anthropology and other sciences for over a century. The understanding of prejudice has changed drastically: first considered an unnatural anomaly and pathology, a form of ‘social cancer.” It is now thought to arise from processes as common and normal as the general human tendency to categorize and simplify in an attempt to make sense of experiences and observations. In this course, we will look at prejudice, its origins and consequences (discrimination), focusing on the emperical research in cognitive and evolutionary psychology, as well as on the social mechanisms that contribute to bias against others. At the end of the course, students should have a deeper understanding of how prejudice is born and promoted at both the individual (micro) level and at the (macro) level of societies and organizations. The course will also address current research on the topic of prejudice prevention.


Instructor: Marta Zakrzewska
Credit: This course is typically given credit by psychology departments.
Prerequisite: One course in psychology.

The course syllabus will be available soon.

During this course, we will examine selected topics in health and social psychology with a main focus on work and organizational psychology. In our discussions, we will be moving from a person-oriented to an organization-oriented perspective. The course consists of two modules:

  1. A person and a situation: work environment, stress, burnout, motivation and goals of an individual, and how are these influenced by the work environment.
  2. A team and an organization: leadership, teamwork, climate, culture, organizational processes, and how to initiate a change.

The goal of this course is to examine and reflect on questions about human behavior at work. You will become familiar with current research findings in organizational psychology, and based on this knowledge, you will be asked to form your own evidence based arguments and recommendations for solving real-life problems at the workplace. We will also examine relevant case studies in the field of work and organizational psychology,


Instructor: Marta Roczniewska
Credit: This course is typically given credit by psychology departments.
Prerequisite: One course in psychology.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.


Instructor: Marta Roczniewska
Credit: This course is typically given credit by psychology departments.
Prerequisite: One course in psychology.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

Humanities

This course is an examination of the cultural history of modern Scandinavia with a unique focus on art and architecture. We will look at how cultural forces such as religion, geography, and views of community and nature have shaped the ways in which Swedes have created urban space and other images of their society, i.e., art. The class will incorporate visits to Stockholm’s well-known museums into the structure and methodology of the course.


Instructor: Peder Fallenius
Credit: This course is typically given credit by art history departments.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

The purpose of the course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of the tradition of Swedish crime fiction, and to stimulate interest and critical reflection on this subject. A selection of acclaimed Swedish crime novels is the main material of the course, but the students will also get acquainted with famous film adaptations in the genre, as well as critical analyses of important works and discussions of the genre in the book market.

The course takes its starting point in the influential author-duo of Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö, creators of emblematic character Martin Beck. The works of Sjöwall & Wahlöö can be seen as the incitement to the way many Swedish authors use crime fiction as a genre where societal problems and political issues can be highlighted. The genre of Swedish crime fiction will be discussed from several points of view, but special attention will be directed towards the relationships of literature to society (e.g. issues concerning class, gender, and how Sweden as a nation is (re)presented in these texts).


Instructor: Tim Berndtsson
Credit: This course is typically given credit by English and comparative literature departments.

This direct enrollment course is taught at the Swedish Film Institute. The course provides an overview of the role of the moving image in Swedish culture and society during the last 100 years, a period when moving image culture became increasingly more important. Swedish film and television culture is presented in relation to international trends and developments. Various approaches are considered, including the analysis of formal concerns combined with different socio-cultural perspectives as well as entertainment genres and avant-garde experiments. Industrial practice and film analysis are discussed with a focus on individual artists. Attention is also paid to case studies dealing with questions of criticism and reception.


Instructor: To be named
Credit: This course is typically given credit by film and English departments.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first 14 Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

*** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by Stockholm University and taught at the Swedish Film Institute. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Swedish Language 1

Study of the Swedish language for beginners. The course contains the following: pronunciation, reading and listening comprehension, descriptive grammar, semantics, written and oral practice. The emphasis will be on communicative and conversational skills, listening comprehension and pronunciation. The content is based on the course literature as well as authentic texts, songs, games, study visits and other activities related to Swedish culture and everyday life.

Swedish Language 2

Study of the Swedish language for students with a background in Swedish. The aim is to raise the student’s level of oral and written proficiency in Swedish and the course is adjusted to the individual student’s language skills and needs. The course contains the following: pronunciation, reading and listening comprehension, descriptive grammar, semantics, written and oral practice. The content is based on the course literature as well as authentic texts, songs, games, study visits and other activities related to Swedish culture and everyday life.

Swedish Language, Advanced

Study of the Swedish language for students with a strong background in Swedish. The aim is to raise the student’s level of oral and/or written proficiency in Swedish and the course is adjusted to the individual student’s language skills and needs. The content is based on the course literature as well as novels, articles, poems, songs, movies, study visits and other activities related to Swedish culture and everyday life.


Instructor: Erik Cardelus

Independent Study

This course option is only open to full-year students in their second (spring) semester.

Independent studies can be arranged in most disciplines. Past topics have included medical ethics, theater, statistics, philosophy, and photography. Your independent study must be approved by the chair of the relevant department at your home institution and our Executive Director. Please download our Independent Study Proposal Form for more information.

There is an additional course fee of $950 to arrange an independent study. If you receive financial aid but your aid doesn’t cover this expense, you can request a fee waiver during registration.

* These Swedish Program courses are also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.
** These are Direct Enrollment courses offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.
*** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by Stockholm University and taught at the Swedish Film Institute. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Fall Semester 2023

August 21–December 9

Please disregard dates/times listed on course syllabi. Regarding prerequisites, we will honor any AP course credit that has been accepted by your home institution.

Economics

This course studies the multiple links between the economy and the environment, and analyzes theoretically and empirically the set of policy instruments normally used to address modern environmental problems. It also considers environmental policy through a political economy lens, namely it analyzes political and societal factors that affect what policy instruments governments tend to choose. Typical questions that will be answered are: What are the most pressing environmental problems? How and why does economic activity create these problems? What are the policy instruments that governments and other relevant decision makers can use to protect the environment? What are the economics costs of environmental regulation and is there a case for a ‘’double dividend” from environmental policy? How do we determine the optimal level of environmental protection at the societal level? What are the economic effects of climate change and why does it prove particularly difficult to pass and implement climate policies?


Instructor: Pamela Campa & guest lecturer Elena Paltseva
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by Economics Departments.
Prerequisites: Two courses in microeconomics, two courses in macroeconomics, and one course in calculus.

This course deals with the economics of European integration. After a brief introduction and history of the European Union, we start with the microeconomics of European integration and examine the effects of moving towards a Europe outlined in the Treaty of Rome (1957) with free flow of goods and services, capital and people. We then turn to the macro-economics of European integration and examine benefits and costs of monetary integration and the adoption of the Euro. The course will give you the theoretical tools to understand various policy issues, ranging from the recent Greek crises to the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) currently negotiated by the EU and the US.


Instructor: Pehr-Johan Norbäck
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by Economics Departments.
Prerequisites: Two courses in microeconomics, two courses in macroeconomics, and one course in calculus. Students lacking one of these prerequisites in economics may be able to enroll with permission from the Executive Director. We recognize that courses at your home institution may be organized and titled differently but cover the same content suggested by our prerequisites. If you need help determining whether your prior coursework fulfills our prerequisites, please contact us at info@swedishprogram.org.

This direct enrollment course provides an introduction to financial economics. The focus of this course is to learn about optimal financial decision making and pricing assets. The topics to be studied include: arbitrage, risk and return, optimal portfolio choice, capital asset pricing model, market efficiency, and financial derivatives.


Instructor: Marcus Opp
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by Economics Departments.
Prerequisites: Two courses in macroeconomics, two courses in microeconomics, one course in statistics, and a GPA of at least 3.3 in prior economics courses. Students lacking one of these prerequisites in economics may be able to enroll with permission from the Executive Director. We recognize that courses at your home institution may be organized and titled differently but cover the same content suggested by our prerequisites. If you need help determining whether your prior coursework fulfills our prerequisites, please contact us at info@swedishprogram.org.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first 10 Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Public Policy, Sociology, and Politics

In the middle decades of the 20th century, Sweden was often held up as a positive anomaly, proof that it was possible to have both robust economic growth and a strong welfare state. Today, talk of the Swedish Model has faded, even as Sweden’s economy and welfare state have continued to evolve. The question we will investigate in this course is whether the Swedish Model can survive in the 21st century in the face of economic restructuring, welfare state retrenchment, a changing electorate, and pressure from the EU and beyond. This investigation will begin by looking at the historical background that allowed the Swedish Model to emerge, and then proceed to a thorough examination of the rise and fall of that welfare state, and finally analyze the future prospects of the welfare state. Along the way, students will gain familiarity with the structure, mechanics, and major players in the Swedish political system, as well as with how Swedish politics compare to both Sweden’s immediate and more distant European neighbors, the role of labor unions and other social movements, Sweden’s role in the larger international system, and with the challenges faced by Sweden in a changing world.


Instructor: Jonas Brodin
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Sociology, Political Science, and History Departments.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

The past few years have seen a powerful resurgence of both nationalism and populism. The goal of this course is to understand why that resurgence is happening and what it means for the future of democratic politics. The course will trace the historical origins and theoretical underpinnings of both nationalism and populism, as well as looking at recent examples of what can happen at the intersection of populist politics and ethnic nationalism—e.g., Yugoslavia and Rwanda—before moving on to examining the current wave of nationalist populism across the globe, from Brexit and the 2016 election in the U.S. to the rise of nationalist populist leaders in countries as diverse as Hungary, India, the Philippines, and Brazil. Because the recent resurgence of nationalism and populism is almost exclusively a right-wing phenomenon, the course will give particular focus to the rise of the radical right, but will also look at contemporary left-wing populism as well as past left-wing populist movements to help shed light on the present. The course takes an explicitly multidisciplinary approach, using economic, cultural, historical, and political perspectives to explain the nationalism and populist comeback—investigating, among other things, the role of social media, the global rise in economic inequality and its underlying causes, and the slow-motion collapse of the postwar system of international governing institutions. Nationalism and populism are not new phenomena, and this course aims to help students situate them in a larger context in order to better understand their current resurgence.


Instructor: Jonas Brodin
Credit: This course is typically given credit by International Relations, Political Science, and History Departments.

What people eat, when they eat, and how they eat reflect the specific history and culture of a society. We will examine how food in Sweden is a reflection or microcosm of the larger culture. The course will examine the ways in which modern and contemporary social, economic, and political changes—in technology, education, family structure, gender roles, public health, environmental protection, and immigration—have led to changes in food culture. Attention will be given to how class, social status, gender, race, and ethnicity affect food consumption, choice, and behavior. Food policy will also be addressed in the context of the development of the Swedish welfare state. Lastly, we will study the current food “revolution” in Nordic countries, highlighted by the recent emergence of internationally acclaimed restaurants in Sweden and Denmark, many of them focused on farm-to-table ingredients.


Instructor: Nicklas Neuman
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Sociology, Anthropology, and Political Science Departments.
Prerequisite: One course in either Sociology, Anthropology, or Public Policy.

The transmission of a virus and a society’s response to halt its spread has a cultural and societal component. How pandemics impact a particular society and the specific strategies adopted to combat it, are related to its health-care system, population density, level of inequality and poverty, and overall social/political structure.

Pandemics, although not unusual from a historical standpoint, are remarkable events that highlight the strengths and weaknesses of societies, opening an opportunity to analyze, reflect, and improve our communities beyond public health. Although the course will present a global and historical perspective, special attention will be given to comparing and contrasting the impact of the COVID-19 virus in the U.S. and in Sweden, and on their different public health strategies to combat the virus.

We will examine the scientific literature to explore the determinants of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, what can be improved, and how to achieve improvements under the framework of sustainable development goals (SDG). Topics to be examined include: the history of epidemics, basic concepts in social medicine and epidemiology, The SARS- CoV2 virus and COVID-19, the role of science in public policy, poverty and social inequalities, urbanization and population changes.


Instructor: Diego Yacaman Mendez
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Sociology and Political Science Departments.
Pre-requisite: One course in either sociology, political science, or public policy.

Sustainable development, as set out by the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, broadened the understanding of companies’ roles and social responsibilities. The role of business in society will be examined focusing on the interdependence between policy makers, civil society, and business. Meeting the UN’s Sustainable Developmental Goals requires understanding the intersection of environmental sustainability, social sustainability, and economic sustainability. By integrating sustainability into core business strategies, organizations can simultaneously create social and corporate value on a sustainable basis—they can create what has been dubbed “shared value” to business and society.


Instructors: Örjan Sjöberg & Susanne Sweet
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Sociology and Political Science Departments.
Prerequisite: One course in Sociology.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first five Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Psychology

Psychological well-being among undergraduate students is a growing research topic among scientific psychologists. Stress and anxiety about friendship, love, financial security, pandemics, and the future of the planet occupy the minds of many university students (and others). Such is the focus of this course.

We will examine the research in social psychology which analyzes current societal conditions in many western societies which are creating an increase in stress and anxiety among young people. In addition, we will examine psychological coping strategies and address the research on what makes most people content or happy, and thus, promotes mental health and general well-being. Health and wellness issues will be examined in relation to different gender and ethnic identities, as well as in the context of cultural notions of success and failure, in school, work, leisure, and in personal relationships. Attention will also be given to how the use of social media—from Instagram to dating apps—among young people can psychologically affect ones sense of personal identity. Our comparative lens will be on the empirical research in social psychology which examines the mental health and well-being among college-aged populations in the U.S. and Sweden, underscoring both differences and similarities in mental health indicators.


Instructor: Miriam Zehnter
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Psychology Departments.
Pre-requisite: One course in psychology.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

During this course, we will examine selected topics in health and social psychology with a main focus on work and organizational psychology. In our discussions, we will be moving from a person-oriented to an organization-oriented perspective. The course consists of two modules:

  1. A person and a situation: work environment, stress, burnout, motivation and goals of an individual, and how are these influenced by the work environment.
  2. A team and an organization: leadership, teamwork, climate, culture, organizational processes, and how to initiate a change.

The goal of this course is to examine and reflect on questions about human behavior at work. You will become familiar with current research findings in organizational psychology, and based on this knowledge, you will be asked to form your own evidence based arguments and recommendations for solving real-life problems at the workplace. We will also examine relevant case studies in the field of work and organizational psychology.


Instructor: Marta Roczniewska
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Psychology Departments.
Pre-requisite: One course in psychology.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

Humanities

This course is an examination of the cultural history of modern Scandinavia with a unique focus on art and architecture. We will look at how cultural forces, such as religion, geography, and views of community and nature have shaped the ways in which Swedes have created urban space and other images of their society, i.e., art. The class will incorporate visits to Stockholm’s well-known museums into the structure and methodology of the course.


Instructor: Peder Fallenius
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Art History Departments.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

The purpose of the course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of the tradition of Swedish crime fiction, and to stimulate interest and critical reflection on this subject. A selection of acclaimed Swedish crime novels is the main material of the course, but the students will also get acquainted with famous film adaptations in the genre, as well as critical analyses of important works and discussions of the genre in the book market.

The course takes its starting point in the influential author-duo of Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö, creators of emblematic character Martin Beck. The works of Sjöwall & Wahlöö can be seen as the incitement to the way many Swedish authors use crime fiction as a genre where societal problems and political issues can be highlighted. The genre of Swedish crime fiction will be discussed from several points of view, but special attention will be directed towards the relationships of literature to society (e.g. issues concerning class, gender, and how Sweden as a nation is (re)presented in these texts).


Instructor: Tim Berndtsson
Credit: This course is typically given credit by English and Comparative Literature Departments.

This direct enrollment course is taught at the Swedish Film Institute. The course provides an overview of the role of the moving image in Swedish culture and society during the last 100 years, a period when moving image culture became increasingly important. Swedish film and television culture is presented in relation to international trends and developments. Various approaches are considered, including the analysis of formal concerns combined with different socio-cultural perspectives, as well as entertainment genres and avant-garde experiments. Industrial practice and film analysis are discussed with a focus on individual artists. Attention is also paid to case studies dealing with questions of criticism and reception.


Instructor: To be announced
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Film and English Departments.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first 14 Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

*** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by Stockholm University and taught at the Swedish Film Institute. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Swedish Language 1

Study of the Swedish language for beginners. The course contains the following: pronunciation, reading and listening comprehension, descriptive grammar, semantics, written and oral practice. The emphasis will be on communicative and conversational skills, listening comprehension and pronunciation. The content is based on the course literature as well as authentic texts, songs, games, study visits and other activities related to Swedish culture and everyday life.

Swedish Language 2

Study of the Swedish language for students with a background in Swedish. The aim is to raise the student’s level of oral and written proficiency in Swedish and the course is adjusted to the individual student’s language skills and needs. The course contains the following: pronunciation, reading and listening comprehension, descriptive grammar, semantics, written and oral practice. The content is based on the course literature as well as authentic texts, songs, games, study visits and other activities related to Swedish culture and everyday life.

Swedish Language, Advanced

Study of the Swedish language for students with a strong background in Swedish. The aim is to raise the student’s level of oral and/or written proficiency in Swedish and the course is adjusted to the individual student’s language skills and needs. The content is based on the course literature as well as novels, articles, poems, songs, movies, study visits and other activities related to Swedish culture and everyday life.


Instructor: Erik Cardelus

* These Swedish Program courses are also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.
** These are Direct Enrollment courses offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.
*** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by Stockholm University and taught at the Swedish Film Institute. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Spring Semester 2024

January 15–May 4

Please disregard dates/times listed on course syllabi. Regarding prerequisites, we will honor any AP course credit that has been accepted by your home institution.

Economics

This course studies the multiple links between the economy and the environment, and analyzes theoretically and empirically the set of policy instruments normally used to address modern environmental problems. It also considers environmental policy through a political economy lens, namely it analyzes political and societal factors that affect what policy instruments governments tend to choose. Typical questions that will be answered are: What are the most pressing environmental problems? How and why does economic activity create these problems? What are the policy instruments that governments and other relevant decision makers can use to protect the environment? What are the economics costs of environmental regulation and is there a case for a ‘’double dividend” from environmental policy? How do we determine the optimal level of environmental protection at the societal level? What are the economic effects of climate change and why does it prove particularly difficult to pass and implement climate policies?


Instructor: Pamela Campa & guest lecturer Elena Paltseva
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by Economics Departments.
Prerequisites: Two courses in microeconomics, two courses in macroeconomics, and one course in calculus.

This course deals with the economics of European integration. After a brief introduction and history of the European Union, we start with the microeconomics of European integration and examine the effects of moving towards a Europe outlined in the Treaty of Rome (1957) with free flow of goods and services, capital and people. We then turn to the macro-economics of European integration and examine benefits and costs of monetary integration and the adoption of the Euro. The course will give you the theoretical tools to understand various policy issues, ranging from the recent Greek crises to the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) currently negotiated by the EU and the US.


Instructor: Pehr-Johan Norbäck
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by Economics Departments.
Prerequisites: Two courses in macroeconomics, two courses in microeconomics, and one course in calculus. Students lacking one of these prerequisites in economics may be able to enroll with permission from the Executive Director. We recognize that courses at your home institution may be organized and titled differently but cover the same content suggested by our prerequisites. If you need help determining whether your prior coursework fulfills our prerequisites, please contact us at info@swedishprogram.org.

In this course, the students will learn the basics of Econometrics (for cross-sectional data) and receive an introduction to Machine Learning (ML). This course also includes further essential mathematical methods that are used in economic and financial analysis. The importance of data science to businesses and economic analysis is discussed. Guest lectures will include relevant professionals from the Swedish industry. The course covers important econometric concepts such as: random sample, central limit theorem, estimation, inference (hypothesis testing), regression models, causality, randomized experiments, as well as the ML concepts: supervised learning (prediction and classification), unsupervised learning (clustering). This course also introduces some mathematics: integration, topics in financial mathematics, and matrices. In this course, the program R is used to facilitate the learning of Econometrics and ML. The students will use different R-packages for the analysis of regression models, causality, randomized experiments, prediction, classification, clustering, etc., and students will also learn how data and results can be visualized. Lastly, there will be an introduction to calculating in Excel.


Instructor: Rickard Sandberg
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by Economics Departments.
Prerequisites: One course in both macroeconomics and microeconomics, one course in calculus, one course in statistics, working knowledge of the statistical software R, and a GPA of at least 3.3 in prior economics courses. Students lacking one of these prerequisites in economics may be able to enroll with permission from the Executive Director. We recognize that courses at your home institution may be organized and titled differently but cover the same content suggested by our prerequisites. If you need help determining whether your prior coursework fulfills our prerequisites, please contact us at info@swedishprogram.org.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first five Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

In order to tackle economic and social challenges, we need to understand how individuals and firms behave and how they respond to policy changes. Economic theory provide ways to think about how agents act. Data allow us to quantify these relationships and test competing hypotheses. This course teaches how economic theory can be used to deepen our understanding economic and social problems, and how data can be used to test the predictions derived from theory. The core part of the course covers the most common methods economists use in empirical research, with a particular focus on causal inference. The empirical methods will be organized around a number of economic and social problems. For each problem, the basic theoretical apparatus required to form testable hypotheses are introduced followed by the econometric techniques used to test the hypotheses. Seminars will focus on applying the theory and econometric techniques using real data.


Instructor: Robert Östling
Credit: This 300-level course is typically given credit by Economics Departments.
Prerequisites: One course in microeconomics, one course in statistics, working knowledge of the basics of econometrics, working knowledge of the statistical software R, and a GPA of at least 3.3 in prior economics courses. Students lacking one of these prerequisites in economics may be able to enroll with permission from the Executive Director. We recognize that courses at your home institution may be organized and titled differently but cover the same content suggested by our prerequisites. If you need help determining whether your prior coursework fulfills our prerequisites, please contact us at info@swedishprogram.org.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first five Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Public Policy, Sociology, and Politics

During the Cold War, the existence of a trans-Atlantic civilization was more or less given—no one questioned that the countries of Western Europe had more in common with the countries of North America than with their immediate neighbors behind the Iron Curtain. In the past several years, however, there has arisen a small cottage industry devoted to puncturing the post-Marshall Plan consensus. In other words, we are now told that Europe and America not only do not form a common civilization, but that they are fundamentally, irretrievably different.

This course will evaluate these competing claims, investigating the similarities and differences between Europe and America from the perspective of public policy. The course will be divided into three major sections. The first section, This is Europe, is an overview of the European Union and its most important policy areas and challenges. The second section, Farewell to the Welfare State?, is an overview of the past, present, and future of the European-style strong welfare state, with a focus on developments in Sweden. The final section, Multiculturalism and its Discontents, is a discussion of Europe’s, and in particular Sweden’s, perhaps greatest challenge: how to deal with a rapidly diversifying population and the resulting conflict between competing sets of values.


Instructor: Jonas Brodin
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Sociology, Political Science, and History Departments.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

Health care systems are embedded in economic, political, and social structures and reflect a country’s cultural values. This class will look at the historical development of health care systems in Sweden and the U.S., medical education, and the type of institutional settings in which health care is provided. We will also look at the role of the health care consumer in each country and how factors such as race, class, and gender impact citizens’ access to and experience in the health care system.


Instructor: Jonas Brodin
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Sociology and Political Science Departments.

People move from one place to another—and always have. Migration might be voluntary and economic—in search of a better life—or forced and political—simply to save one’s life. Whatever the nature of the migration, it always has consequences that go far beyond the simple increases and decreases in population—for example, the current migrant crisis in Europe has strengthened far-right populism and isolationism, seen most dramatically in Britain’s decision to withdraw from the EU. It should come as no surprise, then, that migration is perpetually at the center of our political discourse. In this course, we will investigate migration and its consequences from a number of different perspectives. The first section of the course will take a historical perspective, looking at past migration flows and the many ways in which those flows have transformed the places that migrants leave, pass through, and settle in. The next section examines the migrant experience from multiple angles—from how the rhetoric surrounding immigration influences public policy, to the barriers and policies related to the integration of immigrants in different areas—culture, the labor market, and criminal justice. The final section of the course will critically examine current migration debates and case studies. At the end of this section—and the course—students should be able to analyze those debates and case studies and understand the consequences of migration more fully.


Instructor: Jonas Brodin
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Sociology and Political Science Departments.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

Social innovation can offer new and innovative solutions to meeting societal needs. It therefore offers the opportunity to respond to societal challenges and improve well-being and the
quality of life for communities and societies aross the word. The purpose of this course is to integrate ideas related to social innovation in all sectors of social life to address global challenges. Students will be expected to engage in a project that links social innovation to one or more of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals: no poverty; zero hunger; good health and well-being; quality education; gender equality; clean water and sanitation; affordable and clean energy; decent work and economic growth; industry innovation and infrastructure; reduced inequalities; sustainable cities and communities; responsible consumption and production; climate action; life below water; life on land; peace, justice, and strong institutions; and partnerships for the goals.

The group project will be carried out in teams of 5-6 students. Each team will be part of a larger Tutoring Group (TG) consisting of 4 teams. The aim is to advance each project in a collaborative process, where groups give constructive and supportive feedback to each other. In this process, the teachers will serve the role of facilitators, rather than experts. Consequently, active participation and contribution to other project groups is an important part of the learning process.


Instructor: Sarah Jack
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Sociology and Political Science Departments.
Prerequisites: One course in either political science or sociology.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first five Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Psychology

The nature of prejudice has been a topic of study in psychology, sociology, anthropology and other sciences for over a century. The understanding of prejudice has changed drastically. It was first considered an unnatural anomaly and pathology, a form of ‘social cancer.’ It is now thought to arise from processes as common and normal as the general human tendency to categorize and simplify in an attempt to make sense of experiences and observations. In this course, we will look at prejudice, its origins and consequences (discrimination), focusing on the emperical research in cognitive and evolutionary psychology, as well as on the social mechanisms that contribute to bias against others. At the end of the course, students should have a deeper understanding of how prejudice is born and promoted at both the individual (micro) level and at the (macro) level of societies and organizations. The course will also address current research on the topic of prejudice prevention.


Instructor: Marta Zakrzewska
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Psychology Departments.
Prerequisite: One course in psychology.

The course syllabus will be available soon.

During this course, we will examine selected topics in health and social psychology with a main focus on work and organizational psychology. In our discussions, we will be moving from a person-oriented to an organization-oriented perspective. The course consists of two modules:

  1. A person and a situation: work environment, stress, burnout, motivation and goals of an individual, and how are these influenced by the work environment.
  2. A team and an organization: leadership, teamwork, climate, culture, organizational processes, and how to initiate a change.

The goal of this course is to examine and reflect on questions about human behavior at work. You will become familiar with current research findings in organizational psychology, and based on this knowledge, you will be asked to form your own evidence based arguments and recommendations for solving real-life problems at the workplace. We will also examine relevant case studies in the field of work and organizational psychology.


Instructor: Marta Roczniewska
Credit: This course is typically given credit by psychology departments.
Prerequisite: One course in psychology.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.


Instructor: Marta Roczniewska
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Psychology Departments.
Prerequisite: One course in psychology.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

Humanities

This course is an examination of the cultural history of modern Scandinavia with a unique focus on art and architecture. We will look at how cultural forces, such as religion, geography, and views of community and nature have shaped the ways in which Swedes have created urban space and other images of their society, i.e., art. The class will incorporate visits to Stockholm’s well-known museums into the structure and methodology of the course.


Instructor: Peder Fallenius
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Art History Departments.

* This Swedish Program course is also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.

The purpose of the course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of the tradition of Swedish crime fiction, and to stimulate interest and critical reflection on this subject. A selection of acclaimed Swedish crime novels is the main material of the course, but the students will also get acquainted with famous film adaptations in the genre, as well as critical analyses of important works and discussions of the genre in the book market.

The course takes its starting point in the influential author-duo of Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö, creators of emblematic character Martin Beck. The works of Sjöwall & Wahlöö can be seen as the incitement to the way many Swedish authors use crime fiction as a genre where societal problems and political issues can be highlighted. The genre of Swedish crime fiction will be discussed from several points of view, but special attention will be directed towards the relationships of literature to society (e.g. issues concerning class, gender, and how Sweden as a nation is (re)presented in these texts).


Instructor: Tim Berndtsson
Credit: This course is typically given credit by English and Comparative Literature Departments.

This direct enrollment course is taught at the Swedish Film Institute. The course provides an overview of the role of the moving image in Swedish culture and society during the last 100 years, a period when moving image culture became increasingly important. Swedish film and television culture is presented in relation to international trends and developments. Various approaches are considered, including the analysis of formal concerns combined with different socio-cultural perspectives, as well as entertainment genres and avant-garde experiments. Industrial practice and film analysis are discussed with a focus on individual artists. Attention is also paid to case studies dealing with questions of criticism and reception.


Instructor: To be named
Credit: This course is typically given credit by Film and English Departments.
Enrollment Limit: Limited to the first 14 Swedish Program students who register. Interested students are encouraged to apply early.

*** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by Stockholm University and taught at the Swedish Film Institute. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Swedish Language 1

Study of the Swedish language for beginners. The course contains the following: pronunciation, reading and listening comprehension, descriptive grammar, semantics, written and oral practice. The emphasis will be on communicative and conversational skills, listening comprehension and pronunciation. The content is based on the course literature as well as authentic texts, songs, games, study visits and other activities related to Swedish culture and everyday life.

Swedish Language 2

Study of the Swedish language for students with a background in Swedish. The aim is to raise the student’s level of oral and written proficiency in Swedish and the course is adjusted to the individual student’s language skills and needs. The course contains the following: pronunciation, reading and listening comprehension, descriptive grammar, semantics, written and oral practice. The content is based on the course literature as well as authentic texts, songs, games, study visits and other activities related to Swedish culture and everyday life.

Swedish Language, Advanced

Study of the Swedish language for students with a strong background in Swedish. The aim is to raise the student’s level of oral and/or written proficiency in Swedish and the course is adjusted to the individual student’s language skills and needs. The content is based on the course literature as well as novels, articles, poems, songs, movies, study visits and other activities related to Swedish culture and everyday life.


Instructor: Erik Cardelus

Independent Study

This course option is only open to full-year students in their second (spring) semester.

Independent studies can be arranged in most disciplines. Past topics have included medical ethics, theater, statistics, philosophy, and photography. Your independent study must be approved by the chair of the relevant department at your home institution and our Executive Director. Please download our Independent Study Proposal Form for more information.

There is an additional course fee of $950 to arrange an independent study. If you receive financial aid but your aid doesn’t cover this expense, you can request a fee waiver during registration.

* These Swedish Program courses are also open to SSE students, so you may share the classroom with Swedish and international students.
** These are Direct Enrollment courses offered by SSE. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.
*** This is a Direct Enrollment course offered by Stockholm University and taught at the Swedish Film Institute. Students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester. Click here to learn more.

Direct Enrollment Courses

Our selection of direct enrollment courses offered by the Stockholm School of Economics (marked ** above) and the film course offered by Stockholm University (marked *** above) provide full immersion into the Swedish classroom. You will experience cultural differences in pedagogical philosophy (more emphasis on group/collaborative work), course structure (fewer exams or in some cases, just a final exam), and general expectations of what is required from each student.

Your classroom experience will likely be different from what is familiar – and that is precisely why taking a direct enrollment course is so rewarding. The value of these differences parallel the important value of your overall study abroad experience. Don’t expect things to be the same. Embrace and respect the cultural differences!

Enrollment

Direct enrollment courses are equivalent in credit hours to our other four-credit courses but follow the Swedish semester calendar, which means the same amount of coursework is concentrated into eight weeks of instruction rather than 12 weeks. Thus, students who are considering a direct enrollment course should understand that they will have an additional workload during the first eight weeks of the semester. Conversely, their workload will be much lighter during the last four weeks of the semester when the direct enrollment course has ended. Due to this concentrated schedule, students may register for only one direct enrollment course per semester.

Please review the prerequisites and enrollment limits noted in each course description. All direct enrollment courses have enrollment limits, so interested students are encouraged to apply early.

SSE and Stockholm University announce their course schedules 1–3 months before the start of the semester. Consequently, you will be notified at that time if any of your chosen courses have a scheduling conflict.

Grading

Grades for SSE direct enrollment courses are based on the following grading scale:

A: 75–100     B: 65–74     B-: 60–64     C: 50–59     F: Below 50

All SSE students who fail a course are allowed to take the final exam again. This opportunity will also apply to Swedish Program students taking an SSE direct enrollment course. SSE will announce a specific date for re-examination which cannot be changed. You will likely have already returned home when you would be entitled to take this exam. In order to take the exam again, you must return to Stockholm at your own expense and take the exam at the assigned time and place. There can be no exceptions to this requirement.